hereofamily.com and its partners may earn a commission if you purchase a product through one of our links.

Gizmo Vs Ticktalk: Which Is The Better Choice?

Gizmo Vs Ticktalk Which Is The Better Choice

The Gizmo and TickTalk are two popular kids’ smartwatches. They both have similar features, but there are some key differences. The Gizmo is geared more towards younger kids, while the TickTalk is better for older kids.

Here’s a closer look at comparing two smartwatches: Gizmo Vs Ticktalk 3.

TICKTALK 3

If you’re searching for peace of mind, a means for you and your child to interact with one another, and a way to ease into letting them have a phone, the tick talk is a fantastic place to start.

It’s tough, capable, and comes with all the safety measures a parent would expect. While geofencing, a less bulky watch case, and a better charging mechanism would be nice, it’s a fantastic option for a connected kid’s smartwatch.

TICKTALK 3

Pros

  • The call quality (voice and visual) is excellent.
  • The watch has simple software.
  • Adaptable safety features
  • The watch casing and screen are both water-resistant.
  • The ability to create timetables and reminders

Cons

  • It’s a little heavy.
  • The battery life might be improved.
  • Geofencing isn’t available.
  • Both the watch and the phone’s software might be improved.

A companion smartwatch was designed to endure a fearless toddler, with excellent security features and communication choices. With a few notable exceptions, the TickTalk 3 children’s smartwatch checks most boxes.

My 7-year-old friend’s child and I both enjoy technology and gadgets. He has begun to require a piece after viewing him with various bits of innovation.

His phone is in the hands of a couple of his classmates, friends, and cousins, but my significant other and I are not ready for such a vast advancement at this time. However, we see some practical applications for an accompanying device, such as after-school pick-ups, location data, and communicating when it’s an excellent time to come inside — as well as a dash of fun.

What I like about Tick Talk 3

The TickTalk 3 children’s smartwatch ticks many of those boxes, with a couple of essential cautions thrown in for good measure.

First and foremost, I acknowledge that a cellphone or smartwatch for a 7-year-old is worthless. Still, it can be beneficial and a low-grinding technique for providing specific connection elements within the family.

What I like about Tick Talk 3

This fully functional cell smartwatch floats in a sea of childish “clever things.” The TickTalk 3 contains a slot for a regular nano-SIM card from any GSM-based carrier, such as AT&T or T-Mobile (or, almost inevitable, any of the cheaper paid ahead of time MVNOs that utilize their organizations).

While you may purchase a SIM for it at your shipper, TickTalk has partnered with Red Pocket to give prepaid help for as little as $10 per month. As a result, I gave it to my youngster after activating the SIM card and testing the arrangement on the watch and companion telephone program (for my phone).

The watch itself isn’t beautiful, but it’s sturdy and functional, and it gets the job done. It has a bright screen, so my toddler can read the watch face and menus even in bright sunlight. It’s also IP67 water-resistant, ensuring that the device won’t stop working if my child unintentionally submerges it in a pool or bowl.

There are eight different watch faces to choose from and a corresponding number of backdrops. While you can’t customize them or add your watch faces or foundations, the included ones cover a wide range of tastes for most kids.

For obvious reasons, the screen has a good touch response, although it’s designed to be less delicate than a similar item for adults. TickTalk doesn’t need inadvertent calls, for example, following a touch of abuse, because children are demanding for their stuff.

The TickTalk 3 includes both 4G and Wi-Fi capabilities, which may be used for phone calls, notifications, and even video chats. This watch does have a camera. It’s a 2MP selfie camera with poor quality, but it’ll suffice for inane text messaging and video chats.

Because the watch has both a cell and a Wi-Fi connection, it uses both to aid in location tracking. While the watch does not support geofencing, the fervent following allows you to acquire a background tagged by its location for a specified period.

I may arrange DND time to secure the TickTalk using the phone application. Therefore it must be used to make decisions. If a situation arises, the gadget can still be found and make SOS decisions to a crisis contact and emergency calls using the catches as an afterthought. Guardians can customize these settings using a free Android application.

The watch is prepared to function as an unmistakable telephone, complete with a dial cushion in terms of correspondence. Surprisingly, the parental software provides an option to set up a firewall so that only confirmed contacts can bring in or out; this also disables the dial pad. The same can be said for informing.

The video and informing are handled entirely within the phone program, and calls are handled similarly to any other call. The watch can send emoticons — standard style, just like some adorable energized beast stickers — and pre-made messages or special notes with essential speech updates. There’s also a “radar mode” that allows your child to pair up with friends who have a TickTalk 3 watch so that they may visit together.

What I did not like in Tick Talk 3

While TickTalk 3 has a lot of potentials, there are a few flaws that stand out. The cell network does an excellent job of staying connected in areas with strong signals, but I found the data collection to be inconsistent inside.

Because the watch is only GSM capable, it’s limited to AT&T and T-Mobile, which Red Pocket uses for their MVNO, and the Wi-Fi appeared to be stable and solid for the most part. Indeed, RIP to the battery if the watch was at a standard meeting room for the cell.

When I tested the TickTalk 3, the base device I received had a significant battery drain when LTE and Wi-Fi were turned on, and just a few signs were visible.

I couldn’t renew the watch after it died after only six hours. On the plus side, TickTalk, based in California, provided excellent customer service, and a replacement device arrived within two or three days.

tick talk watch vs gizmo

With the next device, I had much better luck. Thus the problems could have been due to a malfunctioning unit. The watch can last 12+ hours in the DND mode, and there is also a quiet mode to extend battery life even further.

In terms of programming, I’d appreciate the ability to create a password to access the watch’s settings to prevent unnecessary tinkering. APN settings, network flips, and other critical functionality modifications are accessible to a curious child, which should have been secured naturally.

In our experience with the TickTalk 3, the company provided three firmware updates — and nine since the beginning of 2019 — which improved availability and battery life. As a result, they effectively enhance the watch and are open to some suggestions I provided.

My youngster liked the Velcro-style fasten watch band, a standard 23mm size that can be swapped out for something else if needed. When it comes to charging the USB-A, a unique, beautiful pogo nail locks in place but is very simple to remove. TickTalk has a charging case available on their website, like substitute groups.

The watch does not, in any way, charge quickly. TickTalk recommends setting a low battery watch for 8-12 hours, so if the watch is essential for the next day, you or your child should begin charging it every day.

The Bottom Line For Tick Talk 3

Each family and child is unique, so whether or not you need a device like this in the future will be determined by your needs. If you have a child aged 6 to 12 and are looking for a way to communicate with them, this is a good option. You can get a phone for less than $170, but the strength, underlying well-being characteristics, and the fact that it is attached to your wrist will make it much tougher to lose.

To keep a forgetful 7-year-old on track, I liked being able to set reminders for daily chores and homework. We live in the country, so it was convenient to be able to send him and his brother a message when it was time to come inside. I’d get video calls from people who wanted to show me something “amazing” they’d discovered, and those were pleasant moments for both myself and my son.

While the TickTalk 3 is far from flawless, it does the job and keeps us connected for $10 a month.

GizmoWatch 2

The GizmoWatch 2 is a smartwatch for kids that provides them autonomy while giving parents peace of mind. Even though the look is a little dull, the watch is straightforward to operate, and the functionality performs nicely.

The display is bright and colorful, with wide touchpoints for little fingertips. The watch’s location tracking, geofencing, and designated guardian contacts are excellent safety features.

GizmoWatch 2

Pros

  • The call quality is excellent.
  • The watch software is simple to use.
  • Excellent security features
  • The display is bright and colorful.
  • Reminders and alarms are simple to set.

Cons

  • There isn’t a Do Not Disturb mode available.
  • Verizon is your only option.
  • There is no access to the internet.

The features that parents want to be crammed into a fun and practical watch that kids enjoy wearing.

My friend’s 7-year-old son needs a phone, but his parents aren’t ready for it — and he isn’t either. Regardless, launching him off with some technology and demonstrating some responsibility is something they should all look into.

Learning things other than how to use a piece of technology and managing his assets is essential, but so is the behavior of correspondence. As a result, a smartwatch with a cell connection is an excellent first step toward learning those workouts.

The GizmoWatch 2 has the tools to help him learn these things while also giving him the choice of getting some satisfaction from the watch — even if there are a few ruins in the way.

Learning things other than how to use a piece of technology and managing his assets is essential, but so is the behavior of correspondence. As a result, a smartwatch with a cell connection is an excellent first step toward learning those workouts.

The GizmoWatch 2 has the tools to help him learn these things while also giving him the choice of getting some satisfaction from the watch — even if there are a few ruins in the way.

What I Like About Gizmo Watch 2

Whether watching my better half and I use our smartwatches or something he sees on one of his favorite kid’s shows, the desire to interact with a device is the same. There are many smartwatches for kids on the market and those that seem like smartwatches but aren’t. If you require a gadget for your child with security and communication features, we should talk about the GizmoWatch 2.

In terms of design, the watch comes in two colors: blue and pink, which only alters the tie’s color. The tie is a good silicone band that can replace any 20mm watch band. It includes a two-tone plastic case that has held up well to my child’s adventures and IP7 water resistance, which has been beneficial.

What I like about Gizmo watch 2

The Qualcomm Snapdragon Wear 2500 makes navigating the watch a breeze, and the 1.4-inch display is bright and colorful, bringing the watch’s topics to life. When it comes to themes, there are seven to consider, ranging from bright and lively citrus to a striking comic book design. The showcase is easy to use, and the product’s large touchpoints provide the appropriate amount of touch affectability.

While the GizmoWatch 2 isn’t a phone in the traditional sense, it is perfectly capable of making cell phone decisions. My youngster enjoys having the freedom to phone Mom and Dad whenever he wants, whether for assistance with his schooling or to tell us about something spectacular he discovered while playing outside. The watch’s network is provided by Verizon, which is the only option you have.

Verizon Wireless is the smartwatch’s exclusive transporter, so while you won’t be able to use your preferred transporter, the one you get will be reliable. With a two-year contract, the watch will cost you $100, and the line will cost you $10 per month in fees and assessments.

In the best-case scenario, the GizmoWatch 2 worked hard to keep hold of the sign indoors and outside while using the watch in the country, where the network can be inconsistent. Calls to the watch confirmed the two closures, and the watch’s speaker was sufficiently loud for my youngster to hear me even on a breezy spring day.

The watch can also handle informing — both voice and text — and making phone calls. There are pre-programmed messages and emoticons on the device, but there is no ability to add or change them. Your child can also send a voice message in their normal voice or use the voice transformer program on the watch to choose from various amusing options such as a robot, beast, squirrel, and so on.

When it comes to correspondence, the only people who can call the watch — or be contacted by the watch — are the people you add to the parent friend app on your phone. The GizmoHub is used not just to set up the watch but also to control almost all of its functions.

The watch can handle up to ten complete contacts, with four different levels of correspondence approval — watchmen, parental figures, friends, and GizmoBuddies. Regardless, I couldn’t figure out how to make someone a GizmoBuddy. Another important aspect of connections is the ability to establish a crisis contact. Your child can initiate a crisis call by squeezing and holding one of the watch’s two firm keys.

The GizmoHub application also allows you to set alarms, receive regular notifications with unique compensations for completing tasks and keep track of your child’s progress. When it comes to keeping track of your child’s growth, you can set a goal for them and give them an award if they achieve it.

My child’s prize is a pop, a significant risk for him and keeps him very active. There’s also a fun application on the watch that encourages your child to hop for different amounts of time to hear fresh creature sounds.

I like that I can schedule quiet time for the watch to prevent it from making noises. Aside from planning it, you can also physically activate silent mode at any time by selecting it in the app.

GizmoWatch 2 includes GPS for precise area tracking and details in terms of security. On tour inside the GizmoHub, you can view the current location of the watch, which includes a satellite mode. You can also look at the watch’s location history to see where it’s been during the day.

An optional continual following component will regularly ping the watch’s region; however, setting this mode on will rapidly drain the battery. Your child can also use their watch to send you a message about their whereabouts.

What I Don’t Like In GizmoWatch 2

Despite all of the positive aspects of the GizmoWatch 2, including a bounty, it is not without flaws. Even Verizon’s global cell network won’t be able to compensate for the practical limits that a small watch will face in terms of availability.

Because of its size, the watch can only have a limited number of radio wires to seize the signal, which means that the battery is quickly exhausted in the event of a low or no sign.

While the 500mAh cell does an excellent job of lasting the day in most instances, there were a few days when it died before dinner.

Wi-Fi would be an accommodating increase in terms of availability. This would help mitigate some of the watch’s shortcomings while it’s inside.

gizmowatch vs ticktalk 3

When cell reception is poor, calling via Wi-Fi is also a viable option.

This expansion would help with network troubles, but it would also improve battery life.

I understand that this is just a children’s smartwatch, but I wish GizmoHub had a way to see what was causing the battery channel. Was it a bug in the app that was informing you?

Maybe it’s the cell reserve or the area’s GPS pings? Even if one of the final two is a possibility, knowing without a doubt would be nice.

The watch features a quiet mode that can be set or booked through the parent friend app, which is helpful because it turns the device off. However, this does not lock the device to prevent unwanted interruptions such as writing, phone calls, or simply fiddling with the watch.

A full-fledged Do Not Disturb mode would be very welcome, limiting the watch to clock reading and emergency calls.

Fortunately, charging the GizmoWatch 2 is simple enough thanks to its USB-A port, making it a unique and appealing pogo pin dock.

The device charges quickly, in 6-8 hours; however, it has been knocked off the work area in the evening and has gotten away from the charger.

While the screen has a high level of brilliance, indirect daylight maybe a little dim. The watch can be turned on or off, and the screen can also be lifted to wake it up.

However, as my child pointed out, the message on the device was not clear. He’s starting to understand what a complete sentence is, and as he puts it, “I had no idea why the watch said ‘raise wrist’… raise it for what?” Dad, it was unquestionably not a complete sentence.”

The Bottom Line For GizmoWatch 2

Whether you have a small child begging for a phone or simply looking for a way to instill some responsibility and fundamental correspondence behavior in your children, the GizmoWatch 2 is worth a look. While you are limited to Verizon as a cell provider, its organizational strength and breadth of coverage are exceptional. That is if you don’t mind a two-year contract with Verizon.

It’s been fascinating to watch my youngster research innovation, and he has a strong desire to learn. Having a device like the GizmoWatch 2 allows me to place widgets in his hands or on his wrist in a controlled manner, similar to what Mom and Dad have.

Allowing him to wander around our yard and investigate gives him some independence while also allowing him to contact me if he needs anything.

Both my child and I would change some aspects of the watch, but overall, it’s a great device that allows us to play with it while remaining safe in a connected world.

Are you still considering whether or not to buy a smartwatch, see this guide: Are Smartwatches Worth It?

FAQs

What is the distinction between gizmo and gizmo2?

The following are the changes between Gizmo 1 and Gizmo 2: The back and power buttons were moved to the side of the watch from the front. A slight increase in the size of the touchscreen display (1.4 inches, 300×300 pixels in GizmoWatch 2 versus 1.3 inches, 240×240 pixels in the original GizmoWatch)

FAQs gizmo vs ticktalk

What could be better than a gadget watch?

Compared to the GizmoWatch 2, the TickTalk 4 gives your child additional options for who they can contact and how they communicate. The TickTalk 4 has its phone number, but it is only accessible to certain people. Contacts who have been designated can call the watch directly from their phone.

Conclusion

The Gizmo is an enjoyable watch. The Gizmo requires more interaction than the TickTalk, but it’s much better at teaching kids how to interact with technology. The watch is recommended for kids ages three and up.

The TickTalk is better for older kids. It does require more interaction, but the introduction of colors and icons makes it easier to use for kids. HereOfamily hopes you enjoyed these comparisons.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.