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Is It Safe To Hire A Nanny? Top Full Guide 2022

Is It Safe To Hire A Nanny Top Full Guide 2022

When is it safe to hire a nanny? There are a lot of factors to consider. The most important thing is to make sure that you find a reputable and trustworthy individual.

There are a few things you can do to help ensure the safety of your children while they are in the care of a nanny. First, you should always conduct a thorough background check on any potential nanny. Secondly, be sure to set clear expectations and rules from the beginning.

What Does A Nanny Do?

What Does A Nanny Do

In a nutshell, a nanny offers expert one-on-one care for your kid in the comfort of your own home. In essence, they are in charge of providing safe and secure care and loads of attention and excitement.

Most nannies work live-in, while others may work during the day or part-time, only three or four days a week. The contract you draft throughout the recruiting process will specify the particular responsibilities of your child’s nanny.

However, the nanny will do childcare-related activities such as laundry, dishwashing, grocery shopping, cleaning, and meal preparation in most circumstances. In certain situations, the nanny may even be hired as a Nanny Housekeeper, which means they would be responsible for a greater variety of household duties. See the table below for a more detailed breakdown.

Are Nannies Regulated?

Are Nannies Regulated

The government does not regulate nannies. Many nannies, however, may have received official training, such as from Norland College (considered by many to be the pinnacle of nanny training centers) or by completing a recognized, formal certification such as:

  • Edexcel Level 3 BTEC National Certificate NVQ or SVQ Level 3 in Early Years Care and Education CACHE Level 3 Diploma in Childcare and Education
  • Several credentials are available, and many nanny agencies may require their nannies to have multiple certifications and appropriate experience.

You should ensure that each candidate you hire has complete and verified references. If you want to be sure your nanny has been verified, you should know that some may be registered with the following organizations:

  • In the United Kingdom, Ofsted (Office for Standards in Education)
  • Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales is the Welsh equivalent of the Care and Social Services Inspectorate (CSSIW)
  • Home Childcare Approval Scheme in Northern Ireland

Furthermore, hiring a nanny registered with one of the organizations above may enable you to pay a portion of your nanny’s salary via the government’s Childcare Choices initiative.

Types of Nanny

There are several sorts of nannies, so you may be able to hire a nanny on a custom basis to meet your and your child’s requirements. As a result, your contract may be tailored to your specific needs. However, the most prevalent forms of nanny duties may be classified as follows:

Nannies who live in the home: Nannies who live in the home give flexibility. This means they are virtually always accessible to look after your children – whether your kid wakes up unexpectedly early or takes a long time to go asleep or if you have an unforeseen professional deadline or desire to go out unexpectedly. However, the function must be clearly defined since your nanny will need frequent time off. You will also need to offer sufficient housing, including during the nanny’s absences.

Daily nannies: According to an employment contract, daily nannies work a predetermined amount of hours at specific periods throughout the week. They may work more hours in the evenings or on weekends, but the compensation amount for any additional labor should be agreed upon in advance.

Shared nannies: A shared nanny may be appropriate if you have a restricted budget and temporarily need a nanny. It may also work for the nanny, enabling a flexible schedule without being unduly committed to one family.

Nannies with children: If a nanny has their kid and regularly has it with them while working for you, they may work for less money — partially to keep their childcare expenses down. A nanny who has their kid, on the other hand, is unlikely to be able to commit to caring about your child full-time or for unanticipated, ad hoc situations.

Should You Hire A Nanny For Your Child?

Finally, your circumstances and your child’s special requirements will determine whether or not to employ a nanny. However, before making any choice, it is good to weigh the advantages and negatives.

Having a nanny – the pros

One-on-one care: This is arguably the most important reason for hiring a nanny – knowing that your kid is being cared for by an adult while you cannot be there. It may also be better to send your kid to daycare, especially if they are very small since your child will be able to get one-on-one attention and stimulation at home.

It also means that your kid will be able to have a constant connection and bond with one individual, which may help them feel more comfortable in the world.

Flexibility: Most nannies can work around your schedule and requirements. When your plans change and evolve, you may have more confidence that your kid is being cared for securely by someone both you and your child know and trust.

On your terms: If your kid attends nursery, you will have little influence over what they do there. However, if you hire a nanny, you assist in establishing the rules, circumstances, and atmosphere for the nanny-child interaction.

Ease and familiarity: Because nanny childcare will be provided in your house, both you and your kid will be able to transition more quickly when you return to work and other pre-parenthood activities. If your youngster is surrounded by familiar signals, scents, toys, and rituals, it may significantly impact their emotions of security.

It may make financial sense: if you have numerous small children, hiring a nanny to care for them may wind up being no more costly than sending each of them to a separate daycare.

It may relieve stress: If you have a nanny in your house to assist you with peak domestic times such as meal times, school pickup, bathtime, and bedtime, you may find it easier to manage a hectic schedule. A nanny is not cheap, but it may offer you the peace of mind you need to concentrate on your objectives.

Having a nanny – the cons

The cost: Hiring a nanny, like any one-on-one service, will require a hefty financial expenditure. You must pay not only your nanny’s compensation but also all of their work-related expenditures, such as food, gas, and other charges, while they are caring for your kid.

The administrator: You are an employer once you hire a nanny for your kid. This means you must pay them, pay taxes, make pension payments, and conduct other administrative duties.

Dependence: Because a nanny is just one person, unlike a nursery or childcare center, you risk being left in the lurch in the case of illness or another unforeseen occurrence unless you hire your nanny via an agency that offers a prepared substitute as standard.

Regulatory flaws: While there are methods to evaluate a nanny, notably via Ofsted, the regulatory environment remains less ideal. As a result, it is your responsibility to evaluate your nanny’s references and credentials and conduct background checks, including DBS checks. This may be a hardship, and ultimately, you are employing a stranger to perform the most vital of tasks, as are all employers.

6 Steps To Finding Your Next Nanny

6 Steps To Finding Your Next Nanny

1. Outline your needs

Knowing what you want in a nanny might make it much simpler to discover a reliable one that fits in well with your family. Take your time deciding on your nanny’s tasks, expected schedule, and compensation. Make a list of preferred personality qualities, but try to retain an open mind.

Here are a few things to think about:

  • Is there a vehicle available for them to transfer your child?
  • Is their driving record spotless?
  • Are they CPR trained?
  • Do they have any prior experience with or exposure to children?

Consider how often you will need a nanny and when they should be accessible. Do you need them to live with you and look after your children while working? Consider hiring a nanny if you need more than a sitter for your next date night.

2. Find nanny candidates

Get referrals from individuals you trust, such as friends, neighbors, and colleagues. Consider utilizing social media to identify qualified candidates or explore nanny profiles on Care.com, SitterCity.com, or UrbanSitter.com. You may also deal through a nanny placement agency if you don’t mind paying a charge.

3. Interview prospects

This is your opportunity to get to know your potential nanny candidates and introduce them to your family, routine, and expectations. A competent nanny may adapt to several children and have an open schedule to assist.

This phase should have the sense of a discussion rather than an interview. Please inquire about your possible nanny’s hobbies, history, and personality (including how they handle stress and pressure).

  • Begin with the fundamentals.
  • If you are at home with the babysitter or nanny frequently, you may need to discuss the fundamentals.

At the very least, ask the following questions:

  • Have you taken any childcare classes?
  • Are you CPR/First Aid certified?
  • What is the best way to punish a child?
    How do you handle difficult circumstances, such as a newborn that won’t stop crying or a youngster who disobeys you?
  • Do you refuse to submit to a pre-employment background check?

Share your expectations

If you identified your prospects via a nanny recommendation service, they might already have a good idea of what you’re looking for in your prospective nanny. However, whether you’re searching for a local nanny via word of mouth or online, it’s vital to communicate your expectations right away.

  • Please provide them with a work description and a timetable. Will they be on-call, full-time, or part-time?
  • Share information about your children with them. Do your children have any particular requirements or prescriptions that their nanny may need to assist them?
  • Set goals and objectives. Tell them what qualities you look for in a nanny. Does a suitable nanny have a college degree or early childhood education certifications? Are they supposed to assist your kid at school? Or do you need an additional set of hands around the house?

Distribute the salary scale. Your nanny applicants will be interested in learning more about their salary or hourly compensation. You don’t have to offer them a specific figure, but mentioning a salary range might assist.

4. Ask for and check references

One of the most common errors parents make while looking for a reliable nanny is failing to get references.

Request three references from previous employers from your prospects (no friends or personal contacts). Continue by contacting each reference.

Former employers may provide information about the nanny’s trustworthiness, skills, and flaws, so this phase should help you filter down your applicant list to only one or two alternatives.

5. Conduct a trial run

The ideal nanny will not hesitate to meet and spend time with your kid as part of the interview process. Set up a 3- to a 7-day trial period to ensure that the scenario is a good match for all sides.

It’s a good idea to be present for the first day or two since seeing the child-nanny relationship may help you determine whether the arrangement is right for you. If all goes well, give the nanny additional freedom for the remainder of the trial term.

Check-in with the nanny—and your kid, if they’re old enough—at the end of the week to see how things went.

6. Hire your new nanny

If the trial run goes well, give the nanny a more permanent offer of employment. However, if you are unsure after the run, heed your intuition and decline the nanny. It may seem not easy to move on to the other prospects after putting in so much work, but you’ll be a lot happy in the long run if you pick a nanny you trust.

Make a contract for your nanny, even if they work part-time or are on-call. A contract clarifies your new nanny’s expectations, compensation, time off, and chores.

How to Hire a Nanny

A nanny may be a fantastic addition to your family and can help new parents make a move back to work easier. While choosing and hiring a nanny may seem difficult, it does not have to be. Depending on your degree of comfort, time, and price, you may handle most of the effort yourself or use an agency.

Choosing A Nanny Vs. Day Care

Child care decisions are very personal – what works for your friend or sibling may not work for you and your family. While licensed daycare centers and in-home facilities are excellent choices, some families prefer the customized attention that a nanny provides.

Many families opt to employ a nanny in addition to one-on-one care because the arrangement is more convenient. Nannies work on your schedule, so you don’t have to drop off or pick up your kid at a certain time or take time off from work while you are sick.

Having a nanny come to your home also makes getting out the door in the morning simpler since you don’t have to pack additional clothing, shoes, lunch, and snacks for daycare – everything your baby needs is there at home.

What are some of the disadvantages to consider? A one-person staff may not be as trustworthy as center-based daycare – if your nanny becomes ill or is unable to come to work, you will have to remain at home or find alternative care.

You may also have to adapt to having a non–family member in your house (though it is fairly rare for a nanny to become a family member).

Finally, nanny care is often the most costly of child care alternatives. However, this varies based on where you reside.

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Conclusion

Thanks for reading. Hiring a nanny can be a great way to provide quality child care for your family, but it’s important to do your research to hire a responsible and trustworthy individual. Here are some things to keep in mind when hiring a nanny.

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