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How To Carry Tripod On Backpack? Top Full Guide 2022

How To Carry Tripod On Backpack Top Full Guide 2022

The tripod is a crucial piece of equipment for landscape and portrait photography, as well as for reportage, such as when creating posed photographs. The issue with taking a tripod on a hike is that they are frequently long, bulky, and difficult to carry. So, how to carry tripod on backpack for easier transportation?

How to carry tripod on backpack

How to carry tripod on backpack

There are several ways to fasten your tripod to the backpack, but where you put it is important. You require a specific backpack that can handle tripods steadily if you are traveling across long distances. A typical backpack can also be useful if you are simply carrying the tripod to nearby locations.

The tripod’s height and weight are also significant factors. If your tripod is too heavy and your backpack is loaded down with unnecessary items, the straps of the backpack may become broken.

Even when it’s folded, a tripod that is too long could still be damaged with other things if it bumps into them.

Compression straps, side pockets, stabilizer straps, sternum straps, assistance belts, and equipment straps are all components of a travel backpack. Compression and sternum straps, as well as side pockets, can be found on a typical backpack.

The sternum straps and side pockets are features found on every modern backpack.

Examine your bag. For short journeys, it is a good idea to tie the tripod to your backpack if it has any of the mentioned straps.

Mounting it on the center of the backpack

Mounting it on the center of the backpack

A decent option for mounting the tripod is in the middle of the backpack, but you’ll need the straps for that. The front side of the backpack is where you need to fasten the tripod.

The front side straps can be used to mount the tripod, but the drawback is that you have to double-check for longer distances. Consider that you need to exercise caution if you are riding a bike with a bag and tripod on the front.

Additionally, it offers advantages including the fact that you can connect it here regardless of height. In some cases, the tripod can be attached without being folded. This is a good way to avoid the usual unfolding times.

In terms of practical considerations, attaching a tripod in the middle of the backpack, as most people do with their outdoor bags, may cause some challenges. According to my observations, it simply bounces against the interior components like a camera and lens.

Consider that if you place the lens in the bag’s top compartment, the friction between the lens and tripod may cause damage.

Mounting it to the side straps

Mounting it to the side straps

You must mount this tripod in the sidearms of the backpack, just like you would at the center. The majority of the bags have side straps. Naturally, you should also have sidearms in your pack so that you can fasten the tripod.

Your tripod will be stable enough to transport if you attach it here. You can purchase side straps for your backpack on Amazon if it doesn’t already have any.

Attaching the tripod at the bottom side of the Bag

Attaching the tripod at the bottom side of the Bag

The preferred way for securing a tripod to a backpack when traveling is this one. First off, since gravity frequently exerts a pulling force, it doesn’t slip from the hold, therefore there shouldn’t be any problems while moving.

Second, the friction on the tripod won’t harm camera equipment like the camera, lens, or memory cards. Most of the time, you can mount the tripod without using additional straps. Most backpacks include bottom and side straps.

You don’t notice the additional weight since the gravitational pull evenly distributes the weight of the tripod and backpack. However, while hanging in the middle, the weight of the bag and the tripod are felt differently.

Sitting on the ground is the only drawback of this approach. The tripod will be damaged if you set your backpack down by accident or if you sit on the ground while carrying it.

Because of the force you apply to the bag, the tripod’s paint or some of its joints may be harmed. Before taking a seat, you must remove your backpack off your shoulders.

Although it is still a viable alternative when you are strolling, you must attach the tripod to the side packs or the top of the backpack if you are riding a bike while carrying a backpack.

Other Method of Carrying Your Tripod

Use Tripod Straps

Use Tripod Straps

A tripod strap is typically the first place most people go when trying to carry a tripod. The aim is to have a strap that connects to the tripod at both ends, though there are many alternative design possibilities.

With the strap sufficiently loosened, you may also wrap it around your head to create a sling that you can wear over your shoulder. Although it is a straightforward idea, it is crucial that it is correctly made because you will be carrying the weight on your shoulder.

However, using a strap to carry does have a drawback. Without a daypack, you probably won’t go hiking, and the tripod strap may get caught in the strap of your pack.

Frequently, one strap won’t fit properly on top of the other and will begin to move. Before you leave, it’s crucial to have the strap customized to fit your body shape and any additional bags.

If the strap isn’t put up in a way that balances the tripod, you might also notice that it bobs around. If it’s not set up properly, you can find yourself making numerous modifications throughout the journey because this is more obvious on uphill and downhill terrain.

Tripod Bags

Tripod Bags

Many of the choices we’ve looked at don’t provide much protection if you’ve invested in an expensive tripod. It is simple for the legs to become scratched if you frequently pass trees and rocks, whether the material is aluminum or carbon fiber.

Although there is a vast variety of tripod bags available, protection and bulk must be balanced. The cushioning on some more expensive models might rapidly become too heavy and difficult to handle.

Try to choose one with a strong zip and a strap because the zip is the main component that breaks.

They can be carried on your shoulder and used similarly to a tripod strap. The distinction is a bag that is larger but provides more protection. This may be a route worth taking if you have invested a lot in your tripod.

Get a Traveler Tripod

Get a Traveler Tripod

There are scaled-down options if the thought of carrying a lot more weight and size is not worth the trade-off. Traveler tripods come in a variety of sizes and designs and are smaller than normal tripods.

The disadvantage is that you’ll probably lose some of the stability and height that a typical tripod provides. Traveler tripods have shorter legs to reduce weight. You’ll probably notice that you’re hunching over considerably.

It is important to verify the maximum height and the number of leg sections for the model you are considering.

Tripods’ telescopic legs fold into one another, and as a general rule, the fewer leg sections, the more sturdy the tripod will be. But frequently, this also means that it will be shorter.

It’s also important to consider the camera you’ll be using. In general, a tripod needs to be more solid the heavier the camera. You can choose a smaller, lighter tripod than you would for a large DSLR if you are carrying a small mirrorless camera and a light lens.

Use a MonoPod

Use a MonoPod

Three legs are unquestionably more stable than one, but when you have to weigh the additional weight and portability, it’s not as simple. Monopods only have one leg, but they do relieve your hands of some weight.

You can still concentrate on operating and holding the camera still thanks to them. Another advantage is that they fold up into a considerably smaller space and are far lighter.

In comparison to holding a camera in your hands, using a monopod is unquestionably more stable. However, there is still human interaction, and even tiny movements can impact how sharp an image is.

Fortunately, there are monopods with feet that can hold a DSLR independently, albeit they might not be able to support your camera in strong winds. By avoiding physical contact with the camera, this lowers the possibility of camera shake.

There is a fascinating hybrid product. There are items that can be used as both a hiking pole and a monopod if you hike using trekking poles.

Bring Mini Tripod

Bring Mini Tripod

Some products at the lightest end of the spectrum are so little you hardly even notice you’re holding them. Options that are appropriate for cameras of various sizes grow in size and bulk.

To avoid carrying anything heavier than necessary, make sure your camera is the appropriate model. These are more compact than traveler tripods and may frequently be placed into your bag.

Despite their durability, you can only shoot at the ground or the greatest level you can find an attachment for. This is a way to carry a tripod if you just occasionally need one and it won’t significantly affect your trek.

FAQs about How to Carry Tripod on Backpack

FAQs about How to Carry Tripod on Backpack

How do you attach a camera bag to a backpack?

You can put your camera bag inside your backpack for more protection than attach it to the backpack.

How do you keep a tripod from tipping?

Here are the seven most important things to get right to ensure your tripod stays steady.

  • Check the payload of both your head and legs.
  • Check the feet for rubber spikes.
  • Extend the legs in the right order.
  • Only extend the center column last.
  • Don’t overtighten.
  • Use the hook if there is one.

Are think tank tripod straps good?

Even though they can be a little difficult to put on and take off, these straps seem to work okay.

Conclusion

If you’re looking for an easier way to transport your tripod on your next hike, consider investing in a backpack that is specifically designed for carrying tripods. These backpacks feature compartments and straps that make it easy to secure your tripod for hands-free transport.

HereOfamily hope you enjoy reading this article on how to carry tripod on backpack. Thank you for reading!

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